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Spectacular Moree Sunset Supercell 19th December 2020

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Absolutely stunning supercell developed just prior to sunset as I was on the way back to my hotel! It rotated and split into a right mover and left moving supercell with this being the right mover and illuminated by the setting sun.

It produced hailstones to at lest 2 to 3 cm in diameter as the storm passed over head on dusk! It also produced beautiful lightning!

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12 Expert Tips for Writing a Tornado Research Paper

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12 Expert Tips for Writing a Tornado Research Paper

Nature is definitely something majestic and completely unpredictable. Tornadoes are probably some of the most fascinating nature`s creations. They appear from nowhere, bring huge destruction and vanish. Even though we have the most advanced technologies, we still cannot handle tornadoes. The only thing we can do is to stay away from the place where a tornado is expected.

That’s why if you are writing a research paper about tornadoes, it will definitely get attention. However, the topic is not so easy. That’s why we have prepared some tips on custom research paper writing provided by expert writers from EssayLib.

Tips from Specialists on Tornado Research Paper Writing

To make your paper succeed, pay attention to these tips from specialists. We would divide them into two main categories: specific tips and general tips.

Some specific tips are the ones that advice what information you can include in the paper:

  • For example, you might want to describe how tornadoes appear, where and when they occur.
  • You might mention how strong they can be and how long they might last.
  • If you mention about myths and legends about tornadoes, it might make your paper more attractive for the reader.
  • Tornadoes are connected with a lot of destruction and damage. That’s why it is usually requested to describe the measures that one can take to minimize the effects of a tornado or even to save somebody’s life and health.

You shall not forget that a tornado research paper is the usual research paper. That’s why you should follow all the rules that apply to the writing process of a normal research paper.

  • Select the topic you would like to work on. Make sure it covers a specific field to research. If it is too wide, you will have problems with fitting it into one paper. It might also influence your paper quality negatively.
  • Write a thesis statement. Show the main idea of the paper in 1-2 sentences. Be exact, it shall contain the essence of your paper.
  • Read the sources that your teacher has provided. Even if there is nothing interesting in most of them, your teacher will definitely want to check if you have used them. After that, you might research the sources that interest you. There are a lot of materials about tornadoes in libraries, electronic libraries and just online. Use all the resources that are available to collect information.
  • Write a research outline. Based on the notes that you have made during the research, write an outline for your paper. Think about what you are going to include there. Shall it be a paper about where tornadoes are most frequent? Or something from the history of the most devastating tornadoes? Or maybe you have dared to research the topic more properly and would like to write about why and how the tornadoes evolve and why they are more frequent in some places? Whatever you select, you will find a lot of information for the most engaging paper. And for now, make the outline for your future creation.
  • Write a draft. Just write down your ideas based on each portion of the information you have collected during the research.   
  • Check which quotations you can use in your paper. Make sure they are organically integrated into the paper content. At this stage, you can already make the list of references. If you do it without delays, it will save you some time in the future.
  • Revise the content that you already have. Improve the structure, rearrange the parts to make the paper smooth and logical.
  • Proofread the paper, edit errors and typos, improve the parts that aren’t perfect.

A Research Paper Types You Can Be Assigned to

Usually, students do one of the following research paper types:

  • An argumentative paper
  • Analytical research.

In the first case, you need to discuss your idea based on some facts and evidence. Here, you should choose a controversial topic that allows discussion.

In the second case, you have some sources and based on them, you need to perform a detailed analysis of the question.

That’s why before you start your research on tornado, make sure you understand what exactly research paper type you are going to work on. Some students get confused with the task and cannot do the job properly. So, make sure you understand what kind of paper you are writing. If you have any doubts, ask your teacher.

As you can see, there is nothing complicated in writing a paper about tornadoes if you know how to write a research paper. You need to know how to write a research paper and to have some specific knowledge about tornadoes. All the information is available both online and offline, so, make proper research and write a paper that will amaze your teacher.

Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia – 6 March 2021

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Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia - 6 March 2021

Tropical Cyclone Niran has defied the initial forecasts of Monday and has become a much stronger storm than initially expected. Instead of reaching a peak maximum intensity as a Category 2 storm on the Saffir Simpson Scale, this storm progressed into a Category 3 system as it crossed the Coral Sea away from the Queensland Coast.

Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia - 6 March 2021

This storm then developed further to a Category 5 storm across open waters but has weakened slightly to a Category 4 storm on the Saffir Simpson Scale. The tropical cyclone is currently sustaining wind gusts of 130 knots (Approximately 241 km/h) at the core and is moving fast at approximately 37 km/h towards the south east and towards New Caledonia.

Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia - 6 March 2021

The island of New Caledonia is currently under significant threat, especially for the area along the south west coast due to its proximity to the island but may pass just to the south and south west of the island. The south west coastline is expected to come under significant threat of gale force winds and heavy rain over coming hours.

Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia - 6 March 2021

Once the storm clears the coastline, it is expected that the storm will decline in intensity and weaken to a depression by Sunday and Monday.

Tropical Cyclone Niran approaches New Caledonia - 6 March 2021

The Worldview images show a small compact tropical cyclone with visible convection (Cumulonimbus clouds) and a very small eye of approximately 20 km in diameter. To date this season, this is by far the strongest storm to develop within Australian waters.

The images are taken from Worldview (NASA) dated 5/3/2021, Himawari and CIMSS generally at the time the storm is within its strongest phase.

Tropical Cyclone Niran – NE Queensland – 28 February to the 3 March 2021

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Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021

As expected, the tropical depression off the North East Queensland Coast developed into a tropical cyclone late Tuesday and was named Niran.

Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021
Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021

However, the development of the storm has occurred far enough out to sea and as such, its impact onto the coastline has been relatively limited to small areas. Forecast models suggest the storm will now track further to the south east and away from the coastline.

Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021
Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021

The storm which at the time was a tropical depression and later upgraded to a tropical storm (Tropical Storm 23 by CIMSS) had its greatest impact on the Queensland coastline during the Sunday to Tuesday period. During its development, there were two weather stations that were close enough to the core that recorded the following peak wind gusts:-

1 - Arlington Reef - Peak wind gusts of 117 km/h at 2.50 pm and 2.52 pm - 1/3/2021. This weather station also recorded two additional peak gusts of 115 km/h at 5 pm and 6.30 pm on the same day.

Bougainville Reef - A peak wind gust of 109 km/h occurred at 6 pm and 6.30 pm - 2/3/2021.

Both weather stations are located offshore. While there are reports of banana crops being damaged or lost and some structural damage along the affected coast, the strongest wind gusts occurred mainly offshore and thus damage is much less than what it could have been had the storm been closer to the coast.

Rainfall - For the 24 hours to 9 am - 2 March 2021

The storm produced significant rainfall along the coastal fringe with the following occurring:-

Clump Point - 276 mm.

Crowley Beach and South Mission Beach - 216 mm.

Clyde - 186 mm.

Saltwater Creek Alert - 177 mm.

Bucklands - 176 mm.

Being the highest totals.

Rainfall - For the 24 hours to 9 am - 1 March 2021

The storm produced significant rainfall along the coastal fringe with the following occurring:-

Alva Beach - 219.4 mm.

Ayr - 196 mm.

Lucinda Post Office - 186 mm.

Groper Creek Alert - 183 mm.

Halifax Alert - 160 mm.

Being amongst the highest totals.

The regions affected by the high rainfall totals are limited to small areas south of Cairns and around Innisfail and Lucinda.

Tropical Cyclone Niran - NE Queensland - 28 February to the 3 March 2021

The storm developed into a tropical cyclone late Tuesday afternoon as it slowly moved further from the coast. The CIMSS forecast models shows the storm travelling further towards the south east. It is currently passing over waters around 28C to 29C but will encounter colder waters further south. It is suggested that it will reach maximum intensity as a Category Two system with peak wind gusts at the core of approximately 167 km/h but occurring well out to sea. The storm is expected to weaken once it encounters colder waters.

Potential tropical cyclone – NE Queensland – 28 February to 3 March 2021

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Potential tropical cyclone - NE Queensland - 28 February to 3 March 2021

A tropical depression off the north east Queensland coast north east of Mackay and east of Townsville has gained strength overnight and is now under watch for further development into a tropical cyclone.

CIMSS has this storm under investigation as a “Tropical Depression”. There is now distinct circulation close to the core and strong convection (Cumulonimbus clouds) is also visible on satellite photos. The storm presently does not have a distinct eye and its future development now depends on its proximity to the Queensland coast.

Potential tropical cyclone - NE Queensland - 28 February to 3 March 2021
Potential tropical cyclone - NE Queensland - 28 February to 3 March 2021

Offshore weather stations close to the core being:-

  1. Willis Island.
  2. Flinders Island.
  3. Homes Reef.

Are reporting maximum wind gusts of between 39 km/h and 76 km/h.  At the time of writing, the core of the storm is offshore and situated between all three weather stations mentioned above.

Potential tropical cyclone - NE Queensland - 28 February to 3 March 2021

The Flinders Island Weather Station to the south of the core has reported the strongest wind gusts to date being 76 km/h between 1.13 am and 1.30 am 28/2/2021.

Potential tropical cyclone - NE Queensland - 28 February to 3 March 2021

A weather station at Hamilton Island further away to the south west has recorded two peak wind gusts of 82 km/h at 7 am and 7.02 am 28/2/2021.

This storm appears to be moving south east and if it continues that direction, then the storm would remain offshore but at the present time a detailed forecast track has not been developed and at Sunday morning, a tropical cyclone watch had not even been issued.

The system including the monsoonal low within the area has brought some high rainfall totals including:-

Lower Gregory Alert 118 mm.

Preston Alert 112 mm

Up River Road 104 mm.

For the 24 hours to 9 am 28/2/2021 but such rainfall is localized to small areas of the Queensland Coast.

The images attached to this article are taken from CIMSS and Himawari-8 which clearly shows how close the storm is to the Queensland Coast.

Its development will continue to be watched due to its proximity to the coastline.

Addendum 28/2/2021 - Further developments

Since the publication of the above storey, the Bureau of Meteorology has issued a Tropical Cyclone advice for an area between Cape Flattery to Lucinda including Cairns for a possible tropical cyclone to develop in coming days. The storm at the time of issue of the advice at 11.33 am Sunday morning was located approximately 270 km east of Cairns and moving south west at 15 km per hour. However landfall was not expected.

Sea surface temperatures are around 29C off Cairns which would support a tropical cyclone in the range of Category 2 (possibly Category 3).

Another weather station close to the core of the storm being Holmes Reef has reported a peak wind gust of 76 km/h Sunday afternoon which gives an indication of its current strength.

The storm is forecast to develop further into a tropical cyclone during Tuesday 2 March 2021.

The main issue at the current time is heavy rain and flooding of coastal rivers and the highest rainfall to 4 pm Sunday afternoon is 52 mm at Alva Beach. Flood watches have been issued for the coastal areas and rivers due to forecast rainfall for the region.

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