Category Archives: types of storms

Temora Storm Complex 27th November 2017

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Temora Storm Complex 27th November 2017

A few of the higher resolution pics of the Temora storm complex from SW of Temora today. A line of convergence occurred near Narrandera. These literally took off as we passed under them. The main core was further south so we took note of its structure. After some time I noted that the precipitation was persistent and we decided to check it out. This lead to the main chase. Consolidated base and inflow outflow interaction. Lightning caused a grass fire with thin plume rising under the updraft. Unfortunately we had to head back and leave a long lived storm complex go!

temora storm


Storm SW of Temora cranking up. Lightning started a fire - smoke plume below base

Luddenham Hailstorm Storm Chase

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Luddenham Hailstorm Storm Chase

Luddenham Hailstorm

Luddenham Hailstorm

Luddenham was the base for a storm chase resulting in a hailstorm. This severe storm dumped its hail over the St Clair and Colyton region resulting in a severe storm warning for the area. The storm developed from a combination of outflow from the storms new Badgerys Creek NW winds and the sea breeze triple point. Hail to the size of 1.5cm were reported from this storm for up to 20 minutes.

Hailstorms near Luddenham 24th November 2017

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Hailstorms Luddenham 24th November 2017

Higher resolution of the hailstorms Luddenham - pictures are provided here and brief chase report

After a very warm day, storm towers that were already developing spread further northeast towards the Sydney basin. As the sea breeze ventured towards the west, north west winds from outflow of previous storms over the mountains and of course outflow from cells near Badgerys Creek, a triple point allowed for sufficient convergence promoting the development of another storm. This rapidly dumped very heavy rain and hailstones.

Just was lucky for a change and only had to chase 10 minutes away from school/work. Parked and time-lapsed at Luddenham and watched as the new base developed overhead.

This would dump and form a black core on radar which produced hail to under 2cm (perhaps up to 1.5cm based on hits on the car) as we passed through and then filmed pea sized hailstones. Traffic was horrendous so the new core further north was virtually impossible to get through with the storm collapsing. Thanks for the drive from Rodney once again.

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